Friday, December 29, 2006

Any Idiot (or group of idiots) Can Publish a Book on Weight Training

My water polo/swimming athlete let me borrow a book he received as a gift, The Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for Swimming. It contains the traditional bodybuilding/powerlifting-based schlock. The author highlights his qualifications on the back of the book:

National Bench Press Champion USAPL
Regional Power Lifting Champion USAPL
Ohio Bench Press Record Holder
First Class Certified Personal Trainer

ROTFLMAO!

Hey, where do I go to become a "First Class Certified Personal Trainer?"

The book has some decent basic information in it and some really bad information in it, but primarily acts as a glorified ad for a website that provides e-coaching/training services. I couldn't find anything about the company (qualifications) that provides the training services on the website, but I did find some articles by master marketing guru, Ryan Lee. Go figure. This author has very likely attended his seminars. Turns out the company has an entire line of books "Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for X" for just about all sports (25 sports at my count). Hmm, I wonder if they differ at all in content, as they are all by the same highly qualified author. And the best thing about the website is the opportunity to become an affiliate of this group, so you too can rake in the money in the lucrative "I've Got Biceps and Deltoids, So I Know How to Make You A Better Athlete" industry.

Here are some red flags if you are looking for a reference book on weight training for yourself or your kids, regardless of the sport:

1. There are 7 exercises for the biceps and 8 exercises for the triceps.

2. There are 3 different types of calf raises. (What the hell is a "reverse calf raise?)

3. The deadlift is performed with a fixed, straight bar with small plates.

4. The "power clean" is performed with a fixed, straight bar with small plates, with a thumbless grip.

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO FIXED BARS FOR WEIGHTLIFTING MOVEMENTS AND NO THUMBLESS GRIPS!

5. The generic workouts in the back recommend 3 x 12 for the "power clean."

6. The book includes the exercises "21s" or "concentration curls."

7. The book includes "shrugs" as an upper body exercise.

People, it is a scary, but free world out there. How to know the real deal from the not so real deal if you're just the average parent? It is tough. We just have to educate parents and athletes the best we can and help them wade through the schlock. I suppose this idiot should get her act in gear and make a positive contribution to it all, rather than just blabbering about it on the blog.

5 comments:

2 old 2 go slow said...

Did he include Skull Crushers among the best triceps exercises for swimmers?

It's a shame there's a market for crap like this.

The Iron Maven said...

Yes, actually, Skull Crushers are on the list of 8 tricep exercises!

climber511 said...

I suppose this idiot should get her act in gear and make a positive contribution to it all, rather than just blabbering about it on the blog.

Please!

climber511 said...

I suppose this idiot should get her act in gear and make a positive contribution to it all, rather than just blabbering about it on the blog.

Please

Anonymous said...

How about the exercise of choice with the PT's in this area. Ths "Sissy Squat!?"
And not be left out is a favorite with the trainers at the "Y" any execise using gravity boots.
Kev